Sheri Ann Richerson's exotic gardening, elegant cooking, crafty creations, food preservation and animal husbandry... all on two and a half acres in Marion, Indiana!

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    Save The Bees! Here Is How To Help #BeeBold
    Disclaimer: This is a sponsored blogger campaign on behalf of Mamavation. All opinions are my own and were not influenced in anyway. #BeeBold

    There is a continued and unsustainable loss of bees and other pollinators. This is going to have an unimaginable effect on our environment but more importantly our food system. This is why it is time to step up and save the bees! They are our #1 pollinator. Bees pollinate 1/3 of all our crops and are the driving force behind every third bite of food that we eat! In fact, bees are so important that Friends Of The Earth launched a new interactive “bee map” to make it fun and easy for people to learn more about bees. Here is how you can help with the #BeeBold campaign!

    Fruit is the second food babies eat – and without bees, we would have no fruit. #BeeBold and join Friends Of The Earth, Mamavation, myself and many others in the fight to save the bees. There is so much you can do from installing a mason bee house to creating a sanctuary right in your own backyard. Make sure the plants you choose for your sanctuary were not pretreated with pesticides. Neonics are systemic pesticides are toxic to bees. Worse they are a common pesticide used in both home and agriculture applications. The current widespread and continued use of bee-toxic pesticides is simply unacceptable. It is time to take a stand, buy only organic products, encourage local businesses to stop selling products with neonics in them and reach out to the Obama administration to encourage them immediately ban all pesticides that are linked to global bee decline. This is essential to the nation’s food supply, environment and economy!

    Save The Bees! Here Is How To Help #BeeBold

    Bees Are Important

    Did you know before watching the video above that up to 80% of our flowering plants were pollinated by bees? Now think about a world with 80% less flowers – 80% less fruit, because fruit trees flower before they ever produce fruit and vegetables flower too! Imagine using a paintbrush or Q-tip to hand pollinate each and every flower on just one plant. Bees are powerhouse workers who tirelessly collect nectar from each and every flower in the garden. They don’t know that the pollen from those plants fall onto their bodies, but it does and as they fly from flower to flower they transfer that pollen. This is how pollination occurs. This is why bees are so important, so do your part to #BeeBold and help save the bees! 

    Bees really are important, in fact as far as I am concerned they are the most important insects on the planet and certainly the most important pollinator we have. Without bees we don’t have natural honey – and while yes, you can make honey yourself, it is not as nutritious or as delicious as the honey bees make. The sad part is bees are dying off at an alarming rate. Here are some facts:

    • Beekeepers are losing an average of 30% of their hives in recent years. Some beekeepers are giving up completely because the loss if too high to be sustainable.
    • Farmers are unable to meet their pollination needs for crops such as almonds and berries because of bee decline.
    • Bees and other pollinators are essential for two-thirds of food crops such as almonds, squash, cucumbers, apples, oranges, blueberries and peaches.
    • One out of every three bites of food we eat was pollinated by honeybees.
    • Neonics can last in soil, water and the environment for years.
    • Neonics kills bees outright.
    • Neonics also harm butterflies, dragonflies, lacewings, ladybugs, birds, earthworms, mammals and aquatic insects. They are also harmful to soil microbes.

    Save The Bees! Here Is How To Help #BeeBold

    Here Is How To #BeeBold

    Let the U.S. EPA know that they need to step up and protect the environment. There is an urgent need for this to happen right now in both the USA and Canada. Europe and Ontario, Canada have already made laws restricting the use of these deadly neonics. many retailers in the U.S. have taken bee-harming pesticides off their shelves – but we need every retailer to follow suit. Some of these retailers that have started making changes are BJ’s Wholesale Club, Home Depot, Lowe’s, Whole Foods and in the UK – Homebase, B&Q and Wickes. Be aware however that some of these companies are simply requiring products that contain neonics to be labeled. We need to go one step further and stop the sale and use of these products. More than 4 million Americans have signed petitions calling on the Obama administration to put forth protections on bees and other pollinators.

    In May 2015 released its National Pollinator Health Strategy. This failed to address the impact of pesticides including neonicotinoid insecticides. In June 2014, a presidential memorandum was issued by President Obama. He directed federal agencies to establish a Pollinator Health Task Force. Their job was to develop a strategy to protect polliators. The EPA was told to assess the effects of pesticides, including neonicotinoids, on bees and other pollinators. They were given 180 days to accomplish this. However the buck does not stop here – and we all need to do our part to save the bees.

    Begin by creating a bee sanctuary in your own backyard. Follow these 5 simple steps! In the event that you don’t have a yard, simply plant a few flowers in a container or even a window box. Every little bit helps. Be sure to choose native plants and always garden organically – if not for you, do it for the bees!

    Save The Bees! Here Is How To Help #BeeBold

     

    Step 1: Provide Habitat

    Food and shelter are necessary in order to keep bees – or any other pollinator or beneficial insect alive. Bees look for places that provide food and shelter to set up their nests. Native plants that are organically grown are their preference. Gardeners who grow plants from seed should choose untreated seed. A study by Friends Of The Earth and Pesticide Research Institute found that 36 pf the 71 garden plants currently being sold that were bee friendly contained neonic pesticides. That’s a whopping 51% of bee friendly plants. Worse these plants had no warnings on them to let gardeners know they were killing bees instead of planting safe pollinator friendly plants.

    One way to avoid this is to grow native plants – and look for local groups that sell ones they grew themselves. Or find a local nursery that sells organic plants. Native plants are not hard to grow. In fact, when you choose native plants for your garden they thrive so much better than non-native plants. This is because they are already adapted to your area. They handle the weather changes and native pests so much better. This is because plants adapt to the environment they are grown in over the years. When these plants produce seed it is already adapted to the area the plant was grown in.

    Be sure to mix herbaceous perennials with woody plants such as trees or shrubs. It is ok to grow some annual plants for color, but grow mostly native  perennial plants – which are those that come back on their own year after year – as well as native trees and shrubs. Many native plants provide year-round interest or even bloom earlier or later in the season than non-native plants.

    Plant large patches of flowers in your garden. This makes it easier for the bees to find just what the plants they are looking for instead of wasting time flying long distances.

    Bees need access to soil as well – so either don’t mulch some areas of your garden or set containers of sandy garden soil around the garden for the bees. Be aware ground nesting bees may take up residence in areas that are not heavily mulched.

    How To Create A Sanctuary For Bees #BeeBold-9

    Step 2: Provide Water

    Water is necessary – and if you can use rainwater or filtered chemical-free water I encourage you to do so. Bees will drink out of a birdbath if they do not have a source of water – and they most likely will drown. The water in a birdbath is just too deep. You can remedy this however – or you can make a separate bee bath!

    Here are 4 simple steps to making a bee bath!

    A. Select a shallow container. This could be a birdbath, a pan, a dish or a shallow bucket. Think outside the box here. As long as it is shallow and holds water, it will work. Be sure to choose something that has not had chemicals or other harmful substances in it.

    B. Fill the container with rocks, pebbles or wine corks. The goal here is to give the bees a place to perch and drink from.

    C. Add fresh water once or twice a day. Keep the water level below the rocks so the landing zone is bee-safe. On a hot day, one hive of bees can drink over a quart of water.

    D. Place this container on the ground in your garden or near your bee house if you have one. You can create more than one bee bath – and if you have a large property like I do, this is a good idea.

    Save The Bees! Here Is How To Help #BeeBold

    Step 3: Provide A Nest

    You can buy a bee nest such as bee’n’bee nest I have – or you can make one if you are crafty. The important part is to make sure you locate the bee nest in an area protected from the wind. Be sure to position is against a flat surface such as a piece of privacy fence.

    Save The Bees! Here Is How To Help #BeeBold

    Step 4: Go Chemical-Free

    It is best to not use any type of pesticide – even organic ones – on your garden, lawn or landscape. The best way to control pests is to provide habitat to attract beneficial insects and let nature take care of itself.

    However, if you must using something, opt for natural remedies. Be aware of what ingredients are harmful because even organic, natural ingredients can be harmful. Options for natural remedies include insecticidal soaps, oil and of course there are many other eco-friendly pest control options out there. Bees do rest at night and this would be the best time to use these natural remedies if you must.

    Save The Bees! Here Is How To Help #BeeBold

    Step 5: Embrace Weeds, Rethink Lawn

    Lawns are overrated. They take a lot of work to keep looking nice – and for some an array of chemicals. Forget about having the perfect lawn. Dandelions, clovers and other weeds are necessary to pollinators and beneficial insects. In fact, some weeds like dandelions are edible – and good for you. Replace your lawn, save yourself some mowing, opt for flowering plants instead! Make the decision right now to shift to Integrated Pest Management and organic farming or gardening. Support local organic farmers. A recent Oxford University meta study proved that organic farming supports 50% more pollinator species than conventional, chemical-intensive agriculture.

    I hope that each and every one of you who reads this post will choose to make a difference and save the bees! #BeeBold my friends! Here are a few more steps you can take to help save the bees:

    • Ask local garden retailers to stop selling neonicotinoids and pants pre-treated with pesticides. Let them know you will not be buying their plants until they do. Encourage your local gardening friends to follow your lead. Visit beeaction.org for a sample letter to bring to your local retailer.
    • Call President Obama and urge him to direct his administration to protect bees from toxic pesticides. That phone number is 202-456-1111
    • Contact your Members of Congress and encourge them to support the Saving America’s Pollinators Act. That phone number is 202-224-3121.
    • Friends of the Earth is encouraging everyone to host a brunch for bees during the month of August to ramp up pressure on Ace and True Value to urge them to stop selling bee-killing pesticides. Hosting a brunch is easy and anyone can do this even if you live in an apartment. All you need to do is snap two pictures of you and your friends or family around your brunch table. Be sure to take one picture showing everything on your table that was pollinated by bees and one with only items that were not pollinated by bees.  Click here to sign up to host a brunch.

     

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    Top 7 Easy Quick Growing Herbs For Beginning Gardeners

    Beginning herb gardeners may worry about which types of herbs they should grow but there is no need for that because most herbs are easy to grow. However for those beginning gardeners that don’t know where to start, let me recommend these top 7 easy, quick growing herbs. These are slightly hardier plants that don’t require a lot of fertilizer or special work. It is possible to grow these indoors in a windowsill, in a container on your patio or deck or in your garden. Herbs grow easily among vegetables, flowers and even fruits. Make sure they get adequate water – an inch a week is enough typically, keep the weeds away and soon you will harvest an abundance of fresh herbs you can cook with, craft, share or preserve for winter use.

     

    1. Parsley – Parsley is a hardy bi-annual in zones 2-11. Both flat-leaf and curly varieties are easy to care for and grow very well without a lot of extra care. Parsley does well in full sun to light shade, and needs rich soil that is well-drained but moist. It doesn’t do particularly well in heat. It does self-seed however I recommend that you keep a few of those seeds to plant the following year so you have a constant harvest. It is also a good idea to save seeds just in case the birds or other critters eat up all the ones that fall. Weather can also destroy the seeds on the ground especially if the seeds get too wet.

    2. Cilantro – Also known as coriander – this annual herb doesn’t need exceptionally rich soil. It does well in full sun or light shade. It is relatively easy to care for, and does well in almost all zones. This year I planted mine under the partial shade of my plum tree and it has done better than ever! Cilantro is the leafy part, the seeds are coriander. Save some to plant again the following year – and of course, dry some to put in your spice cabinet.

    chives in bloom

     

    3. Chives – Chives are a perennial herb. Chives can grow well in almost any soil, and under almost any conditions. Chives have been known to be seen growing in old gardens that haven’t been tended in many years! They hardy in zones 3-9, and prefer full sun. They does do better in rich soil, but don’t need it to survive. Chives have a rich, oniony flavor, and they taste great on baked potatoes. They self-seed like mad! The purple blossoms are edible and make a wonderful herb vinegar. Plant them around your roses to protect them from some insects and also to increase the scent. They are a member of the Allium family and all members of this family are great companion plants for roses.

    4. Oregano – This is an extremely popular herb, and goes well with many different types of foods. It is commonly used in tomato-based pasta dishes, chicken dishes, and pork dishes however it also works well in breads, vegetables and more. Hardy in zones 5-9, oregano does well in raised beds, rock gardens, alongside roads or pathways, or just about anywhere! It needs full sun and well-drained soil, but it actually does better in poor, rocky soil! My favorite variety is one often sold under the name hot and spicy. I think it has a better flavor.

    5. Thyme – Thyme is a perennial herb. It is hardy in zones 4-6. It’s a small, shrub-like herb that requires full sun and moist, well-drained soil. It is quite hardy in its standard zones, and doesn’t require much care at all once you get it established. There are many types of thyme from plain ones to lemon or orange-scented thyme. There is even a rose thyme. Honestly I can’t taste the difference in them but the lemon thyme does have a nice lemony scent and some varieties of it are variegated.

    6. Basil – Basil in a warm-weather annual herb but it also does quite well indoors in a sunny window. It is hardy in most zones, but it requires hot, dry conditions to reach peak flavor. It needs full sun, and very rich, moist soil. The only major issues with growing basil are slugs and cool conditions. As long as basil has enough light and heat, and its soil is allowed to dry out between waterings, it usually requires little additional care. I typically plant basil around my tomato plants. They are great companion plants plus when I pick tomatoes I can also pick basil and put a leaf or two in the bottom of my jars of canned tomato sauce. Basil leaves also make a great addition to fresh salads or lime mojitos.

    7. Bay – Although bay is a type of shrub, this is actually a very good herb for beginners to grow. It’s hardy in zones 8-11, and is remarkably hardy in those zones. It needs full sun to light shade, and rich, well-drained soil. It will tolerate variations in conditions rather well. Just remember, bay leaves reach their full flavor when dry. I grow my bay leaf in a pot and bring it into the cool greenhouse during the winter. It does not mind the 50 degree Fahrenheit temperatures at all. I do use some fresh leaves when a recipe calls for them but typically I lay the leaves out on screens and allow them to dry naturally.

    fresh-herb-mix

     

    Keep in mind that most herbs do perform the best when they are grown in full sun. They prefer the hot summer weather, although they will thrive at lower temperatures as well. The most important things to keep in mind is to make sure to keep the soil evenly moist and harvest 1/3 of the plant on a regular basis. It is always best to harvest before the plant flowers unless you want the flowers. The reason for this is because once the plant flowers, the leaves lose some of their intense flavor. It is also best to harvest herbs in the morning right after the dew dries. This is when they are at their peak flavor.

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    nethat

    Disclaimer: I received this item for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest, unbiased review. All opinions are my own.

    It’s been a rainy spring and summer here in Indiana so I was quite happy to receive the #cldbrandsnethat Mosquito Repellent Camouflage Safari Net Hat for trial. The weeds are taller than they have ever been and it is almost impossible to mow because some areas of our yard sit in water. When we do go outside, there are bugs and mosquitos everywhere. The #cldbrandsnethat has helped to alleviate the biting insects on my face and neck. It is lightweight, comfortable to wear and the netting does not restrict my vision in any way. The elastic neck is especially nice because it hugs to the contours of my neck and keeps bugs from getting in that way.

    In addition to using this hat in the yard or garden, it is ideal for hiking, hunting, traveling, fishing and camping. In fact, any type of activity where petty, flying bugs are an issue. I am very happy with my #cldbransnethat. I no longer have to use mosquito repellent on my face, neck or hair. Best of all, don’t have to deal with mosquitos and the resulting itch from their nasty bite. I recommend everyone get one of these mosquito repellent camouflage safari net hats. After all, you never know when an extremely rainy season might hit your neck of the woods.

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    3 Tips Container Gardening

    Start With Good Soil

    Growing plants in containers doesn’t have to be difficult. Here are several tips for creating a wonderful hanging basket or container garden this summer. Begin by using an artificial soil composed mostly of peat moss. Good soils such as Fafard or Pro-Mix use perlite, peat, and other ingredients to produce a soil that will not compact over the summer. Real garden soil compacts and turns into concrete under the pressure of regular watering. And when it does, plant roots stop growing because they require good open spaces to move into and absorb nutrients. Hard, compacted soils do not grow good plants so do not use real soil in your containers. I re-use my artificial potting soil from year to year. I dump it out of the pot. Chew it up with a shovel to cut up all last yearís roots and add approximately 10 % by volume of compost. The compost increases air spaces and gives plants a boost in healthy nutrition. I also make my own soil using peat moss, vermiculite and perlite. This mixture is sterile enough for seed starting and good enough to grow large tropical plants in. I top off each container plant with 3 inches of compost per year to add nutrients.

    PhotoShoot4

    Fertilize Organically

    It is important to feed your container plants weekly. Nitrogen, the engine of plant growth, is water soluble and as you water your containers from the top the dissolved nitrogen is leaving from the bottom. I use a fish-emulsion liquid feed with seaweed to provide all the trace nutrients my plants require and recommend it highly. I also sprinkle kelp in the top of my container plants, then mix it into the compost. You can use any liquid plant food that you like to promote growth but keep in mind that I recommend you choose one that is organic. Compost tea is the Cadillac of liquid plant food and if you make your own compost tea, your plants will respond with bigger and better blooms as well as increased vigor. Moo Poo Tea from Authentic Haven Brand is a wonderful compost tea that I recommend.

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    Water Throughly

    And finally, no matter the size of the container, it is important to soak it all the way to the bottom at each watering. Continue watering until water emerges from the pot bottom. This ensures the roots can reach all parts of the container and grow properly. Under watering or over watering is the main cause of failure in growing container plants – or even in ground plants – as far as I am concerned. Ideally you want the soil to remain evenly moist. If you use saucers under your pots to catch the runoff, dump them after 10 to 15 minutes. Leaving the pots sit in water is a recipe for disaster – unless your plants needs lots of water. There are always a few exceptions to every rule but for the most part, don’t let your plant sit in water. Letting the soil dry out is another recipe for disaster. It happens sometimes even to the best of us. If it does, at this point try to submerge the pot in a bucket of water so the soil can get a good drink and leave it there for 15 minutes or so. If the pot won’t fit in a bucket, give it a real good drink two to three times so the soil and roots can soak up plenty of water. Be sure to allow the plant to drain well after either one of these processes.

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    Follow these three simple tips and you are sure to succeed with your container gardening goals this year. Remember these tips hold true for both indoor and outdoor plants. From flowers to herbs to vegetables you can grow almost anything in a container as long as the container is large enough and the plant properly cared for.

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    the best-2

    Let’s face it, as gardeners we all want a beautiful yard. Some of us want the prettiest yard on the block – others want the best garden on the local garden tour. Whatever your goal, it’s easy to spend a fortune every year creating a beautiful yard – even if the only thing you grow is a vegetable garden! These five gardening tips can help save you money in both this, and future gardening seasons.

    Tomatoes are just one of the many crops grown in the community gardens in Marion, Indiana.

    Plan Your Vegetable Garden

    1. Plan your vegetable garden according to what your family, friends or neighbors are planting so you can share your vegetables when they’re ready for eating. Many of us – myself included – know what it is like to have too many of one kind of vegetable because you can’t give what you grow away because my everyone’s were ripe at the same time. While you can donate the produce to your local food pantry or soup kitchen even these places can end up with too much of the same item like zucchini or tomatoes and the food goes to waste. Another option is to learn how to preserve the food you grow so you can eat it during the winter months when grocery store prices are high. While this option does take some work, it can save a lot of money on your grocery bill.

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    Buy Perennials, Start Annuals From Seed

    2. Select perennials rather than annuals for your flowerbeds. As they multiply each year, cut them back and exchange plants with your friends so you both have lovely gardens and save money at the same time. Grow annuals from seed, select ones that are heirlooms so you can save the seeds to plant the following year. Again, divide up who will grow what initially so you can swap seeds that fall. Most seed packets come with an abundance of seeds anyway so another idea is to go in on packets of seeds with other gardeners then split the seeds up when they arrive.

    Compost

    3. Compost your kitchen scraps, as well as your coffee grounds and tea bags. The end result is much better than any potting soil you can ever get buy from a nursery or hardware store. The price is right, and this is definitely recycling! For those who have chickens, let them help you break down your compost pile. It will keep it bug free, you won’t need to do the turning and they will turn any kitchen scraps into manure plus you will save on your feed bill by letting them eat those scraps.

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    Mulch

    4. Instead of using mulch, try pebbles or small rocks in your garden as ground cover. This will save you lots of cash since you won’t need to buy mulch in the spring and fall of every year. For those who prefer mulch, check with your local utility company, tree companies that work in your area or even the local landfill. Many of these places will give you the mulch they chop up from the trees they cut down because it saves them the expense of paying to dump it. Local landfills often have a  separate area for mulch or sometimes even compost – best of all it is often free or very cheap.

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    Buy Quality Tools

    5. Spend more money now by purchasing better quality gardening tools and you will save in the long run. They will last for years, saving you dollars because you don’t need to replace them every planting season. The same goes for gardening gloves- make sure you buy the best you can afford so they last all season. Be sure to check out the gardening tools before you buy them too so you know if they are a good fit for you. I prefer a shorter shovel and like the ones with the steps on them. This makes it easier for me to use.

     

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    3oIS7hJJY7rvgVEF.jpg

    Disclaimer: I received this item for free or at a discounted price in exchange for my honest, unbiased review. All opinions are my own.

    I’ve wanted to try LED grow lights for years – and had just trailed one right before the one from #growhobby. LED grow lights are different – and some of those differences are very noticeable such as the location of the red and blue lights. Other differences are not so noticeable such as the chipset inside them. I love the way the #growhobby LED grow light has taken away the dullness on my plants and turned the leaves shiny. While I don’t know the science behind why this works with this particular light and not other LED grow lights, I know what I have seen happen. I also know this light would be ideal for seed starting – and I do a lot of that.

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    Instead of using this Led light on germinating seeds, raising seedlings, cuttings or clones for this trial I chose to use it on some adult plants that needed a little extra boost. The winter here in Indiana often leaves my tropical plants looking a little on the scraggly side. I’m sure some of you know what I mean. Once summer arrives and the plants go outside they look real nice within a month or so but by then it is almost time to bring them back indoors for the winter. I knew there had to be a better, easier way to get my plants to perform and look the way I wanted them to year-round. The LED #growhobby light is the answer although it is not powerful enough on its own for full fruiting so expect to use a different light for that phase.

    I love the small, compact size of the #growhobby LED grow light. It doesn’t produce damaging heat buildup because it has better heat dissipation then the resin material PCB board many LED lights have. This means no more heat sinks or fans to set up to keep your plants from experiencing leaf burn. The Smart LED Technology means there is no mercury to worry about. Another advantage is there is no need to keep replacing bulbs over and over again – we all know that can get real expensive! The German Imported Osram Chipset is of a high quality. The body of the #growhobby LED light is made of 99% oxidized aluminum. I also like that the 98% transmission rate glad optical LEF lens means no yellowing problems.

    The #growhobby is easy to use too, just screw it into a standard North American Bulb Socket (e26 base). It is only 12 Watts so it is inexpensive to use. It lasts 50,000+ house, putting out 800 Lumens. For those who want to know even more technical information the red LED ratio is 660nm 3pcs; 630nm 6pcs and the blue LED ratio is 460nm 3pcs.

    While this light will work for some hydroponic operations, it is not good for intense operations. Use this LED grow light for seedlings, leafy vegetables, herbs, cloning plants, cuttings, caring for plants such as what I am doing with mine. It is great for orchids or similar tender plants. I am very happy with the results I am getting from the #growhobby LED grow light. Once my plants are looking good and ready to move on to the next stage I will simply put them under a more intense light. This light is going to be get most of its use on seedlings. We all know the healthier the seedlings, the healthier the plants! I truly love this light and the difference it is already making in what was a not so nice looking plant. I am sure you will love it too.

    Learn more about GrowHobby an LED Grow Light and Garden Company. Be sure to enter the giveaway contest on their site as well.

    For those who wish to buy the #growhobby LED grow light right now, use coupon code E4WG8QXX to save 30%!

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    jvzYK0AUugdYXQSO.jpg

    Disclaimer: I received this item for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest, unbiased review. All opinions are my own.

    I love the #plantabottle – and don’t know how I ever lived without it! I can’t begin to tell you how many plants I have killed because I did not water them enough or went on vacation leaving them in charge of someone else who did not give them enough water. In fact the two things that I believe kill plants the most is not enough water or too much water. With the #plantabottle those days are gone. Just insert the piece into the soil your plant is growing in, fill a bottle such as a dark colored beer or soda bottle with water and insert it. The plants roots then get just the right amount of water because the soil soaks up the water from the #plantabottle as it is needed.

    This eliminates dumping saucers of water to keep your plants roots healthy and guessing just how often and how much to water your container plants. I cannot tell you how wonderful this is. I consider myself very well versed on how to care for tropical container plants but let me tell you I have learned I was under watering my tropical plants. Seriously. They seemed to be thriving but once I started using the #plantabottle in the containers I found out how quickly they were soaking up the water – in addition to my regular watering schedule – and they are now really thriving.

    You can use these indoors or out – and I have them both places. I love that they have the natural clay look similar to clay flower pots. For those who are wondering, I chose to use brown beer bottles because I felt that a dark colored bottle might be better both to help prevent the water from getting so hot outside and to prevent algae. Now I am not certain this is going to work but so far, so good – and given that I am refilling these bottles frequently I can rinse them out well and if need be rinse them once with hydrogen peroxide just to keep bacteria from forming.

    I truly love these #plantabottle containers and wonder how I ever lived without them. The truth is I killed a lot of plants – and watched a lot of plants fail to thrive without realizing it was due to lack of water. Pick a set up today and find out for yourself how great these work and how much they simplify plant care!

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    636 360 Moringa Giveaway

    Moringa Seedling Giveaway

    Spring is the perfect time to Plant Moringa, it will love the heat that is about to come and take off… Moringa can grow up to 20 feet in one season if given enough heat, water and nutrients.

    2 Winners

    4 Moringa Oleifera Seedlings & Seeds each

    When

    May 17 – May 2oth – 12 am EST

    Value

    $37.50 each winner plus the cost of shipping

    Sponsor

    Blue Yonder Urban Farms
    http://blueyonderurbanfarms.com

    Purchase From Amazon

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00I7BSK60

    Who Can Enter

    Anyone who is 18 years or older and resides in the continental US only… No Alaska or Hawaii shipping.

    Winner Notification

    Winner will be notified by email, and has 24 hours to respond, if winner does not respond in 24 hours a new winner will be chosen.

    Enter Giveaway

    a Rafflecopter giveaway

    Giveaway Terms & Conditions

    http://blueyonderurbanfarms.com/giveaways-terms-conditions

    Related Posts

    Growing Moringa Seedlings
    http://blueyonderurbanfarms.com/2376/growing-moringa-seedlings

    Powdered Moringa
    http://blueyonderurbanfarms.com/1642/powdered-moringa

    50 Moringa Seeds
    http://blueyonderurbanfarms.com/1754/50-moringa-seeds

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    Disclaimer: I received this item for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest, unbiased review. All opinions are my own.

    The #yardiculture window bird feeder is a great way to get birds to perch right outside your window so you get a close-up view. It is ideal for homes, offices and schools but do expect people to get distracted watching the birds eat. It does take a while once you set it up for the birds to find it, but I filled mine with black oil sunflower seeds and within a week the birds were cleaning it out. It is very well constructed, durable and the entire feeder is easy to remove for cleaning. I can just leave the suction cups in place.

    I love the little rubber perches – and the fact that I can remove the tray without removing the entire feeder. All I have to do is lift it up and it comes right off. There is no distortion when you look through the acrylic and in my opinion the construction of this one definitely had some thought put into it because it is heads and tails above the rest.

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    Disclosure/Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links. I received many of the products mentioned in these blog posts for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own. This blog is written by Sheri Ann Richerson. Any guest posts are clearly marked with the guest authors name! All photos and blog posts are copyright. Do not republish any of the photos or blog posts without written consent. Sharing on social media is fine. Thank you for understanding!
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    Q9WxEk7zKGiAjV4r.jpg

    Disclaimer: I received this item for free or at a reduced price in exchange for my honest, unbiased review. All opinions are my own.

    I love the Ramini Brands #GerminationTray 3 Seeder Pots and here is why. I have been planting from seed since 1998 and over the years have used a lot of different types of plastic seed starting trays. I have also worked in a nursery transplanting seedlings into plastic seed trays and I have to say these 3 Seeder Germination Trays are the best I have used.

    The seed trays are sturdy. I was able to hold them in my hand and fill them with moist seed starting soil without them bending and spilling. This is great! I can’t tell you the amount of mess this will save because I can fill the pots right over the soil container instead of moving the wet soil to the seed trays.

    The sturdiness of the seed trays makes me think saving them from year-to-year is going to be easier too. I always try to do this but often end up with damaged bottoms from removing the seedlings.
    I really like these and look forward to using them for years to come. If you are looking for sturdy seed starting trays, give these a try. I know you will love them as much as I do!

    Almost a month later, I am still impressed with the sturdiness of the #germinationtray seed starting pots. The pansy seeds I planted are slow to germinate but that has nothing to do with the #germiantiontray.

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